How Code Blue
Helps Waterfronts

Code Blue’s emergency communication solutions have been attractive to cities, municipalities and parks, especially in high-volume, high-traffic areas that serve swimmers, boaters and tourists. In places like Florida, New Jersey and Louisiana, they could be used to alert and inform people about hurricane conditions. In California, they can provide assistance during earthquakes. The applications are virtually limitless.
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Customers include:

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San Francisco, CA

Call boxes can be found on the Golden Gate Bridge to assist visitors and help prevent suicide jumpers.
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St. Joseph, MI

Pedestals are equipped with life ring enclosures that immediately alert first responders when accessed.
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Santa Monica, CA

Pedestals along a pedestrian path near the water provide communication with the local police.
“What we’ve found is taking some of the guesswork out of that response for police and fire made a lot of sense. By having a push button, it eliminates the question of where we need to respond, and we’re hopeful having Code Blue on the beach will make it simpler for first responders to get to the exact location where help is needed.” - Brian Dissette, South Haven City Manager
 

Popular Waterfront Products

 


CB 1-s with Dual Faceplates
and Public Address

The 360-degree, 400-watt, six-speaker array delivers maximum audio clarity and range to a wide audience, while the rugged, cylindrical pedestal enclosure offers high visibility with an integral area light that ensures rapid location identification in an open environment when the emergency speakerphone is activated.
 
 


Blue Alert® MNS

Blue Alert MNS can deliver alerts about potentially dangerous situations, like extreme weather conditions or active shooters, through multiple platforms, including public address speakers.
 
 


CB 4-u

The flexible wall/pole mount is designed for areas without accessible power or phone lines and comes with a NightCharge® option that can pull power from a switched light grid and operate 24 hours per day, even when the grid is off.